Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHudgens, Bryan
dc.contributor.authorPetit, Carey
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Rita
dc.contributor.authorMable, Leon
dc.date2006
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T16:58:39Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T16:58:39Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/403
dc.descriptionThe following article is taken as an excerpt from the proceedings of the annual Acquisition Research Program. This annual event showcases the research projects funded through the Acquisition Research Program at the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. Featuring keynote speakers, plenary panels, multiple panel sessions, a student research poster show and social events, the Annual Acquisition Research Symposium offers a candid environment where high-ranking Department of Defense (DoD) officials, industry officials, accomplished faculty and military students are encouraged to collaborate on finding applicable solutions to the challenges facing acquisition policies and processes within the DoD today. By jointly and publicly questioning the norms of industry and academia, the resulting research benefits from myriad perspectives and collaborations which can identify better solutions and practices in acquisition, contract, financial, logistics and program management. For further information regarding the Acquisition Research Program, electronic copies of additional research, or to learn more about becoming a sponsor, please visit our program website at: www.acquisitionresearch.org. For further information on or to register for the next Acquisition Research Symposium during the third week of May, please visit our conference website at: www.researchsymposium.org.;The goal of this research is to suggest a framework for developing measures of success for corporate level Air Force acquisition initiatives. Because this research is exploratory, it focuses on only one initiative: the 2002 initiative Focus on results, not process. A qualitative method approach was used to suggest a four part framework. Through the review of literature, common steps for creating metrics were established and recurrent characteristics of good metrics were identified. Then interviews were conducted with acquisition practitioners who have experience with the initiative. Finally, those three parts were applied to the initiative as a case study and metrics suggested as a result. This study gives Air Force leaders clear, implementable metrics that can be used as measures of success for the initiative, and provides recommendations to improve this initiative's performance and that of future corporate Air Force acquisition initiatives. This study also gives leaders insight into whether or not this initiative and others like it are an appropriate and effective way to drive the changes they are meant to bring about. Finally, from a broader perspective, the framework used in this study can be used to develop metrics for other corporate level initiatives.
dc.descriptionThird Annual Acquisition Research Symposiumen_US
dc.format.extent31 p.: ill.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsApproved for public release, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.titleDevelopment of measures of success for corporate level Air Force acquisition initiativesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.identifier.oclcocn318643937
dc.identifier.npsreportNPS-AM-06-075


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record