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dc.contributor.authorLooney, Robert E.
dc.date2006
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-16T18:26:28Z
dc.date.available2014-04-16T18:26:28Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationEconomic Consequences of the New Iraqi Constitution, Gulf Yearbook 2005-2006, Gulf Research Center, 2006, pp.365-382.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/40676
dc.descriptionGulf Yearbook 2005-2006, Gulf Research Center, 2006, pp.365-382.en_US
dc.description.abstractConstitutions can play a critical role in founding and unifying new or renewing states: Iraq is no exception. A new constitution for post-Saddam Iraq can play a key role in reunifying and strengthening the national consciousness of the country. It can also lay the foundation for the creation of a viable dynamic economy. To many the constitution drafted and ratified in the summer of 2005 holds out this promise. To others, the ratified constitution contains too many flaws and inconsistencies to enable the country to escape from its current state of violence and economic stagnation. Even worse many contend1 that unless a series of contentious issues surrounding the constitution and the events leading up to its drafting are resolved quickly, the integrity of Iraq as a unified state will be in question.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEconomic Consequences of the New Iraqi Constitutionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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