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dc.contributor.authorLooney, Robert E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-21T16:22:48Z
dc.date.available2014-04-21T16:22:48Z
dc.date.issued2006-12
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal on World Peace, Vol. XXIII, No. 4, December 2006.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/40856
dc.description.abstractEconomic recovery is important for stability and peace in Iraq. The Iraq Study Group proposed financial aid to Iraq of around $5 billion annually, while President Bush has increasingly stressed the importance of job creation in that country. Unfortunately, significant economic progress in Iraq is unlikely unless part of a comprehensive strategy is designed to overcome several forces currently impeding reconstruction and economic recovery: (a) the growth and dynamics of the shadow or informal economy, (b) the deterioration in social capital, and (c) the evolving relationship between tribes, gangs and the insurgency. The dynamic interrelationship between these factors is causing a downward economic spiral. Progress in one or two areas alone will not be capable of generating significant economic gains. All of these factors need to be addressed.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Iraqi Impasse: Sustaining Economic Reconstruction During War-Timeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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