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dc.contributor.authorLooney, Robert E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-21T17:27:13Z
dc.date.available2014-04-21T17:27:13Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Energy and Development, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2005.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/40876
dc.description.abstractAn economic irony that is gaining increasing attention is the “resource curse” effect, whereby many of the poorest and most troubled states in the developing world have paradoxically the highest levels of natural wealth.1 In fact, a growing body of literature that suggests resource wealth itself, especially where it accounts for the bulk of government revenues as in the case of the so-called “rentier states,”2 may harm a country’s prospects for development. National growth data bear this out: rentier states with greater natural resource wealth tend to grow more slowly than their resource-poor counterparts.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleA Dual-Track Development Strategy for Saudi Arabiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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