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dc.contributor.advisorMiller, H. Lyman
dc.contributor.authorDay, Jana R.
dc.dateDecember 2002
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:40:26Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:40:26Z
dc.date.issued2002-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/4092
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, numerous issues largely ignored during the era of Sino-American strategic cooperation emerged to complicate U.S.-China relations. Key among these has been human rights, which both countries view differently. Whereas the United States emphasizes individual civil and political liberties, the People's Republic of China (PRC) primarily advocates economic, social, and cultural rights. This has provided a major source of conflict as Washington has attempted to compel Beijing to provide civil and political liberties to the Chinese people, which Beijing has long withheld in order to preserve power. These differences, combined with a lack of consensus in Washington regarding China policy, the influence of competing interests groups, and the dilemma policymakers face between protecting national interests and upholding American values, makes human rights difficult to address. This thesis offers recommendations regarding a more effective approach to human rights improvements in China. The United States should emphasize China's obligation, as a responsible member of the international community, to comply with international human rights standards. Most importantly, Washington must maintain a strong and consistent stance on the issue. This is particularly true given Beijing's recent attempts to use the international war on terrorism to legitimize its repressive policies in Xinjiang.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/humrightsinsinoa109454092
dc.format.extentx, 94 p.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHuman rightsen_US
dc.subject.lcshChinaen_US
dc.titleHuman rights in Sino-American relationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderChristoffersen, Gaye
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorPeople's Republic of Chinaen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorSino-American relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S.-China relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorHuman rightsen_US
dc.subject.authorUyghur Xinjiang Autonomous Regionen_US
dc.subject.authorWar on Terrorismen_US
dc.subject.authorXinjiangen_US
dc.subject.authorUyghursen_US
dc.subject.authorUighursen_US
dc.subject.authorChina policyen_US
dc.subject.authorHuman rights policyen_US
dc.description.serviceFirst Lieutenant, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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