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dc.contributor.authorSarasvathy, Saras D.
dc.contributor.authorDew, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorRead, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorWiltbank, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-15T23:11:29Z
dc.date.available2014-05-15T23:11:29Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationOrganization Studies, Vol. 29, Issue 3: 331–350, ISSN 0170–8406, 2008, SAGE Publications
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/41241
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0170840607088017en_US
dc.description.abstractHuman artifacts lie on the interface between their inner environments and their outer environments. Organizations, therefore, are apt subjects to be studied through a science of the artificial. Furthermore, organizational design happens at two interfaces: first, at the interface between organizational founder(s) and the firms they design, and second, between the firms and the environments in which they operate. We use recent developments in the study of entrepreneurial expertise to show why an effectual logic of design is necessary at the first interface, and what its consequences are for designing at the second. In particular, we use the exemplar case of Starbucks to codify three key characteristics of the design problem at the first interface — namely, Knightian uncertainty, goal ambiguity and environmental isotropy. We then use an ‘alternate histories’ method to trace four strategic options — namely, planning, adaptation, vision and transformation — for designing at the second interface. In the final analysis, organizational design is important because effectuators using transformational approaches not only design organizations, but concurrently end up designing the environments we live in.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleDesigning Organizations that Design Environments: Lessons from Entrepreneurial Expertiseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorscience of the artificialen_US
dc.subject.authoreffectuationen_US
dc.subject.authorisotropyen_US
dc.subject.authoruncertaintyen_US
dc.subject.authorgoal ambiguityen_US
dc.subject.authorStarbucksen_US


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