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dc.contributor.advisorNieto-Gomez, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Oscar R.
dc.dateMar-14
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T15:19:35Z
dc.date.available2014-05-23T15:19:35Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/41416
dc.description.abstractThis thesis focuses on the following questions. Why does a relatively low level of trust characterize U.S.-Mexican defense relations? Has the long-shared history of the two policies helped or hindered the building of trust? What are the main obstacles to the strengthening a military-to-military partnership based on trust? In particular, what should the U.S. military do to ensure better cooperation between both militaries to meet the security challenges confronting North America and beyond in the twenty-first century? This thesis will determine why prior U.S.-military engagements with the Mexican military have been ineffective in shaping a relationship based on trust. This research study highlights the historical and cultural paradigms that have challenged the relationship between the U.S. and Mexican militaries. The focus of this research is not to blame the professionalism and effectiveness of the Mexican military to combat these security challenges, but to study a policy environment, and provide policy recommendations of trust-building mechanisms to be incorporated (from the U.S. side) to help build a solid relationship built on trust, not capabilities. Finally, this study addresses key factors that have prevented a trust-building program, and will outline a range of policy options that the U.S. military forces can use to build a much-needed trust between these two institutions.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/buildingtrustcha1094541416
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBuilding trust: the challenge of building partnership capacity in U.S.-Mexico military relationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBerger, Mark T.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorBuilding partnership capacityen_US
dc.subject.authortrust-buildingen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S. military relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorSEDENAen_US
dc.subject.authorSEMARen_US
dc.subject.authorUSNORTHCOMen_US
dc.subject.authorUSSOUTHCOMen_US
dc.subject.authorprofessional military educationen_US
dc.subject.authorPMEen_US
dc.subject.authorWHINSECen_US
dc.subject.authorIAFFAen_US
dc.subject.authorMexican militaryen_US
dc.subject.authorInternational Military Education and Trainingen_US
dc.subject.authorsecurity cooperationen_US
dc.subject.authorprofessional developmenten_US
dc.subject.authorInter-American Air Forces Academyen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary engagementsen_US
dc.subject.authorMexican military cultureen_US
dc.subject.authorFelipe Calderonen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Arts In Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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