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dc.contributor.advisorBarreto, Albert "Buddy"
dc.contributor.advisorHansen, James
dc.contributor.authorHutchins, Richard Chad
dc.dateDecember 2013
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-02T16:11:29Z
dc.date.available2014-07-02T16:11:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42447
dc.descriptionReissued May 2014 with additions to the acknowledgmentsen_US
dc.description.abstractKnowing the future weather on the battlefield with high certainty can result in a higher advantage over the adversary. To create this advantage for the United States, the U.S. Navy utilizes the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) to create high spatial resolution, regional, numerical weather prediction (NWP) forecasts. To compute a forecast, COAMPS runs on high performance computing (HPC) systems. These HPC systems are large, dedicated supercomputers with little ability to scale or move. This makes these systems vulnerable to outages without a costly, equally powerful secondary system. Recent advancements in cloud computing and virtualization technologies provide a method for high mobility and scalability without sacrificing performance. This research used standard benchmarks in order to quantitatively compare a virtual machine (VM) to a native HPC cluster. The benchmark tests showed that the VM was feasible platform for executing HPC applications. Then we ran the COAMPS NWP on a VM within a cloud infrastructure to prove the ability to run a HPC application in a virtualized environment. The VM COAMPS model run performed better than the native HPC machine model run. These results show that VM and cloud computing technologies can be used to run HPC applications for the Department of Defenseen_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/feasibilityofvir1094542447
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleFeasibility of virtual machine and cloud computing technologies for high performance computingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Sciences (IS)
dc.subject.authorVirtual machinesen_US
dc.subject.authorcloud computingen_US
dc.subject.authornumerical weather predictionen_US
dc.subject.authorhigh performance computingen_US
dc.subject.authorbenchmarksen_US
dc.subject.authorcloud infrastructureen_US
dc.subject.authorinfrastructure as a serviceen_US
dc.subject.authorCOAMPSen_US
dc.subject.authorCOAMPS-OSen_US
dc.subject.authorcontinuity of operationsen_US
dc.description.serviceCivilian, Department of the Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Information Technology Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Technologyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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