Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDobrokhodov, Vladimir N.
dc.contributor.authorCamacho, Nahum
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:31Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42593
dc.description.abstractThis thesis develops, implements, and validates a hybrid energy-harvesting technique that enables extracting energy from the environment by utilizing convective thermals as a source of potential energy, and exploiting solar radiation for photovoltaic (PV) energy to achieve long endurance flight of an autonomous glider. The dynamic behavior of convective thermals, as well as their mathematical models, are studied to determine their motion, while the navigation task is simultaneously solved using a Bayesian search approach that is based on the prior knowledge of the 3D elevation. This study advances an existing technique for detection of thermals by implementing the online identification of the airplane sink rate polar. The glider’s climb rate is optimized by implementing a modified thermalling controller, and its performance is compared to an existing method of centering in thermals. The integration of the energy extracted from the solar radiation is accomplished by the design of an Electrical Energy Management System (EEMS) that safely collects and distributes the energy onboard. The electrical energy is supplied by the semi-rigid mono crystalline silicon solar cells, which are embedded into the skin of the glider’s wings without distorting the airfoil. To validate and verify the algorithms developed in MATLAB/Simulink, an interface to a high-fidelity pilot’s training flight simulator was designed. Furthermore, the numerical algorithms were integrated onboard a prototype SB-XC glider equipped with solar cells to enable the desired energy-harvesting technique. Flight test results verify the feasibility of the developed algorithms.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleImproving operational effectiveness of Tactical Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Systems (TALEUAS) by utilizing solar poweren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderKaminer, Isaac
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)
dc.subject.authorconvective thermalsen_US
dc.subject.authorthermalling controlen_US
dc.subject.authorsystem identificationen_US
dc.subject.authorphotovoltaicsen_US
dc.subject.authorBayesian searchen_US
dc.subject.authorguidanceen_US
dc.subject.authornavigationen_US
dc.subject.authorpath planningen_US
dc.subject.authorElectrical Energy Management Systemen_US
dc.subject.authorMATLAB/Simulinken_US
dc.subject.authormathematical modeling and simulation.en_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, Mexican Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMechanical Engineer And Master of Science in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record