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dc.contributor.advisorNaegle, Brad
dc.contributor.advisorYoder, Cory
dc.contributor.authorCreighton, Daniel P.
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Andrea C.
dc.contributor.authorMundt, Glenn
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:34Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:34Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42603
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this thesis is to research and provide a comprehensive overview of contingency contracting practices within the United States as they apply during major disaster response scenarios. To do this, we analyzed three major disasters that occurred within the last twenty years. These are the Northridge, CA earthquake of 1994, Hurricane Katrina in LA in 2005 and Hurricane Sandy, impacting much of the northeast in 2012. We specifically picked these events for several reasons. They are large disasters with a voluminous amount of data available, they are geographically dispersed around the country, and there was sufficient time between each disaster to allow changes to contingency contracting plans and policy to change and be implemented. Our research and analysis focused on the events of the disaster itself, what contingency contracting preparations were in place prior to the disaster occurring, what types of contracts were awarded during the recovery phases, and what types of contingency contracting policy and procedure changes were made in in the aftermath of the disaster to make the system work more effectively and efficiently. Lastly, during each disaster we highlight what worked well and what did not and recommend changes to contingency contracting policy to avoid committing the same mistakes again.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/contingencycontr1094542603
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleContingency contracting in support of CONUS disasters: a case study of the 1994 Northridge earthquake, 2005 Hurricane Katrina and 2012 Hurricane Sandyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorContingency Contractingen_US
dc.subject.authorStafford Acten_US
dc.subject.authorFEMAen_US
dc.subject.authorDHSen_US
dc.subject.authorDODen_US
dc.subject.authorAdvanced Contracting Initiativeen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited States Army Corps of Engineersen_US
dc.subject.authorDual Status Commander.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Colonel, United States Marine Corps; Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy; Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army Reserveen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Program Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineProgram Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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