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dc.contributor.advisorOlsen, Richard
dc.contributor.authorDeMello, John E.
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:35Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:35Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42606
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractLIDAR has widely been used to create very accurate 3-D models for use in a wide range of commercial, governmental and nonprofit applications. This thesis identifies how recent advancements in Nd:YAG fiber lasers and InGaAs GmAPDs could be applied to space-borne missions, enabling low-cost solutions that fulfill NASA’s ICESat-2 and United States Geological Survey (USGS) objectives. An analysis of launch vehicles, standard spacecraft buses and payload technologies identified three potential low-cost solutions: one hosted aboard Iridium and two onboard a BCP2000 commercial bus. These systems were evaluated using NASA’s mass-based and aperture-based cost models to provide a rough estimate of cost versus NASA’s CALIPSO, ICESat-1 and ICESat-2 missions. Preliminary analysis shows a potential for these new technologies to outperform any previous space-based LIDAR mission. At $55M, the Iridium-hosted solution is 1/16th the cost of ICESat-2 at roughly one-third its capability. Two other solutions were estimated at $216.6M and $370.586M and provided over 3X and 10X the estimated capability of ICESat-2, respectively. Both systems are anticipated to fulfill NASA’s ice sheet and vegetation objectives while delivering a return on investment of roughly $1B per year based on USGS’s analysis of advanced 3-D data for the United States.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/lowcostdirectdet1094542606
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleLow-cost direct detect spaceborne LIDARen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderDurham, Susan
dc.contributor.departmentSpace Systems Academic Group
dc.subject.authorLIDARen_US
dc.subject.author3-Den_US
dc.subject.authorNASAen_US
dc.subject.authorElevation dataen_US
dc.subject.authorLaser Altimeteren_US
dc.subject.authorLADARen_US
dc.subject.authorCALIPSOen_US
dc.subject.authorICESaten_US
dc.subject.authorGmAPDen_US
dc.subject.authorFiber lasersen_US
dc.subject.authorUSGSen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Space Systems Operationsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSpace Systems Operationsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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