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dc.contributor.advisorAbenheim, Donald
dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Brian M.
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:43Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42640
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractAs the image of the thermonuclear apocalypse loomed over the early years of the Cold War and technological advancements brought the possibility of such a fate closer to reality, the U.S.-Soviet conflict became increasingly a battle for hearts and minds—on the home front as well as among allied populations. However, public diplomacy in a democracy is more complicated than a public relations campaign, for actions often trump words, particularly in the case of nuclear strategy. This thesis examines the aims of policy, strategy, and mass persuasion and its civil-military character as manifested in the atomic public diplomacy in the Cold War until the 1980s, but especially of the classical period, 1940s–1960s. Specifically, it studies public presentation of nuclear issues through three media: U.S. television, the Soviet peace offensive, and official communiqués of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). In each example, leaders sought to shape citizens’ views on warfare in order to garner the support necessary to carry out an expensive strategy that required tremendous faith from the political public. These three examples shed light on the importance of mass politics in the creation and implementation of strategy in an era of high tension and rapid technological innovation.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/thermonuclearpro1094542640
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThermonuclear propaganda: presentations of nuclear strategy in the early atomic ageen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorNuclearen_US
dc.subject.authoratomicen_US
dc.subject.authormass communicationsen_US
dc.subject.authorpropagandaen_US
dc.subject.authorpublic diplomacyen_US
dc.subject.authorNorth Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)en_US
dc.subject.authorSovieten_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorEuropeen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Europe and Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe and Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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