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dc.contributor.advisorChatterjee, Anshu
dc.contributor.authorKator-Mubarez, Amina
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:46Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42655
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe Afghan government is preparing to deal with the world’s largest youth bulge, a demographic event that threatens to destabilize the country if the Afghan government and U.S. aid agencies do not disarm the grievances of Afghan youth, especially at the university level. This thesis examines higher education in Afghanistan from the 1930s onward and describes how various regimes affected educational policy while in power. Also examined is how Afghan youth have historically been a source of instability if their grievances are not addressed. Despite tremendous efforts by the Afghan government and U.S. aid organizations to improve higher education after the Taliban era, implementing effective policies continues to problematic. This thesis answers the questions of why the Afghan government and U.S. aid agencies have had such a difficult time in implementing effective policies to address the youth bulge and challenges to higher education in the country. Evidence is provided to show that poor infrastructure, outdated curricula, unqualified instructors, corruption, religious activism, insecurity, high levels of unemployment, and underemployment are detrimental to national stability, as Afghan youth flock abroad in pursuit of better opportunities or join the insurgency out of desperation.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe youth bulge and higher education in Afghanistan: challenges and the way forwarden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorYouth bulgeen_US
dc.subject.authorhigher educationen_US
dc.subject.authorinstabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorinsurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorcorruptionen_US
dc.subject.authorcurriculaen_US
dc.subject.authorinfrastructureen_US
dc.subject.authorprotestsen_US
dc.subject.authorTaliban.en_US
dc.description.serviceCivilian, Department of the Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Combating Terrorism: Policy and Strategy)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Combating Terrorism: Policy and Strategy)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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