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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Kevin B.
dc.contributor.authorKubisak, Timothy D.
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:47Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42664
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractData has been collected on acoustic vector sensors mounted on autonomous underwater gliders in the Monterey Bay during 2012–2013. Previous processing work computed the acoustic vector intensity to estimate bearing to impulsive sources of interest. These sources included small explosive shots deployed by local fishermen and humpback whale vocalizations. While the highly impulsive shot data produced unambiguous bearing estimations, the longer duration whale vocalizations showed a fairly wide spread in bearing. In this work, causes of the ambiguity in bearing estimation are investigated in the context of the highly variable bathymetry of the Monterey Bay Canyon, as well as the coherent multipath interference in the longer duration calls. Sound speed data collected during the previous experimental effort, along with a three-dimensional bathymetric relief of the Monterey Bay Canyon, are incorporated into a three-dimensional version of the Monterey-Miami Parabolic Equation Model. Propagation results are computed over a frequency band from 336–464 Hz in order to provide predictions of pulse arrival structure. This data is analyzed using conventional pressure plane-wave beamforming techniques in order to highlight horizontal coupling caused by the canyon bathymetry. The data is also analyzed using the previously developed acoustic vector intensity processing string and shown to exhibit a qualitatively similar spread in the estimated bearing.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/investigationofc1094542664
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleInvestigation of acoustic vector sensor data processing in the presence of highly variable bathymetryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderKapolka, Daphne
dc.contributor.departmentPhysics
dc.subject.authorAcoustic vector sensorsen_US
dc.subject.authorbearing estimationen_US
dc.subject.authorintensity processingen_US
dc.subject.authorparabolic modelingen_US
dc.subject.authorthree dimensional propagationen_US
dc.subject.authorunmanned underwater vehiclesen_US
dc.subject.authorUUVen_US
dc.subject.authorvector intensityen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Applied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineApplied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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