Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFreeman, Michael
dc.contributor.authorLasiter, Nolan O.
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:49Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42671
dc.description.abstractThis study addresses the question of whether violence leads to governments making concessions. There were four hypotheses proposed that support the research on this question. The first proposed that there was no correlation between levels of violence and concessions. The second proposed that concessions increase as violence increases. The third proposed that concessions decrease as violence decreases. The final hypothesis proposed that there would be no concessions until a certain level of violence was reached, which was designated as a tipping point. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) served as the sample case study of this analysis. The findings indicate that there is no statistically significant relationship between levels of violence and the Colombian government making concessions to the FARC. Regardless of the amount of violence that the FARC perpetuates each year, the Colombian government does not make concessions. Further analysis suggests that there may be a relationship between presidential parties, elections cycles, and governments making concessions.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/whendogovernment1094542671
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWhen do governments concede to terrorists?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBurks, Robert
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorGovernmenten_US
dc.subject.authorconcessionsen_US
dc.subject.authorviolenceen_US
dc.subject.authorColombiaen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record