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dc.contributor.advisorNussbaum, Daniel
dc.contributor.advisorPaulo, Eugene
dc.contributor.authorMorse, Matthew M.
dc.dateJune 2014
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:17:53Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:17:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42692
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractAs the Marine Corps pursues greater energy efficiency in expeditionary operations, the HOMER micropower optimization model provides potential to serve as a powerful tool for improving Marine Corps power planning. The HOMER software was developed for the modeling and simulation of micropower systems over long periods of time. Although a deterministic model, HOMER uses stochastic input data, specifically solar irradiance, temperature, and load profiles. HOMER simulation fidelity is therefore affected by the inter-annual variability of these profiles. This research quantifies HOMER robustness with regard to solar irradiance and tem-perature profile variability through full-factorial experimental designs. The effect of shortening HOMER simulation duration on the variability of HOMER simulation outputs is also investigated, and though statistically significant, the resulting increase in variability is not large enough to preclude the use of HOMER for expeditionary operations. This thesis also demonstrates how HOMER can assist in developing power planning doctrine, showing that the fuel consumption benefits of using multiple generators of different sizes is no longer present once a renewable energy asset is added to the micropower system. This analysis of HOMER’s robustness and operational potential provides insight for improving the Marine Corps’ use of HOMER for power planning in an expeditionary environment.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/assessingoperati1094542692
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleAssessing the operational robustness of the HOMER model for Marine Corps use in expeditionary environmentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBalogh, Imre
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Science
dc.subject.authormicropower systemen_US
dc.subject.authorsolar irradianceen_US
dc.subject.authorinter-annual variabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorsimulationen_US
dc.subject.authordesign of experimentsen_US
dc.subject.authordeterministic modelen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineModeling, Virtual Environments and Simulationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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