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dc.contributor.advisorEar, Sophal
dc.contributor.authorSteensen-Schulz, Oliver-John
dc.dateJun-14
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:18:01Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:18:01Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42732
dc.description.abstractLike Japan in the 1970s, the People’s Republic of China is currently facing economic growth measured in double-digit numbers. As both countries have faced, and continue to face, energy resource scarcity to feed their economic growth, they have reached out to the world to get these resources. How did Japan and how does today’s China ensure access to needed energy resources like oil and gas? How can these efforts be viewed according to international relations theory? Both countries use oil-producing companies, financial/development aid, and strong government support directly to domestic companies and within accompanying policies and negotiations to support their companies. The Japanese government tapped economic growth to become a global economic power, but is China more interested in using economic growth to maintain the ruling party’s power and the government itself? In terms of international relations theory, Japan and China show a realist approach in feeding their energy hunger, with the difference that Japan was and still is much more integrated into a variety of international organizations. This difference shows a bit of a liberal-institutional approach, but with realist goals set by the state. Although this thesis makes this comparison and applies international relations theory for a better insight into the economic development and long-term goals of Japan and China, it cannot specifically predict China’s future relationship with resource-rich countries and the international community.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/japansndchinasec1094542732
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleJapan’s and China’s economic growth and energy hunger in comparative and historical perspectiveen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBarma, Naazneen H.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorPeople’s Republic of Chinaen_US
dc.subject.authorJapanen_US
dc.subject.authorinternational relations theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorenergy resourcesen_US
dc.subject.authoreconomic growthen_US
dc.subject.authordevelopment aiden_US
dc.subject.authorforeign policyen_US
dc.subject.authorloans-for-oil policyen_US
dc.subject.authorUN sanctionsen_US
dc.subject.authorconditional aiden_US
dc.subject.authoraccess to resourcesen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, German Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, and The Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, and The Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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