Spectral mixing of camouflaged targets

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Authors
Chandler, John Wells.
Lyon, Suzanne Elizabeth
Subjects
NA
Advisors
Olsen, Richard Christopher
Date of Issue
1994-12
Date
December 1994
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
A fundamental problem in target detection is the separation of a target and its background, particularly when the target is camouflaged. It is possible to discern camouflaged objects in vegetative backgrounds using reflected light in the visible and infrared range. Reflectance data was taken of five camouflage nets draped over various vehicles with a predominately green background. The aim of this analysis was to reconstruct the spectrum of the observed scene using a linear combination of individual basis spectra called "pure" endmembers. Linear spectral mixing assumes that the observed spectral radiance may be modeled as a linear combination of members of a "pure" endmember spectral mixing library. The computer algorithm written for this analysis demonstrated the ability to use linear spectral mixing to reconstruct an observed spectrum. The analysis of the abundance mixtures showed that consistent exploitable patterns exist with this type of data. The task of reconstructing the observed spectra was performed with a crude, "non-pure" endmember library. Even greater success could be achieved with a more sophisticated and complete library.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
85 p.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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