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dc.contributor.advisorBruneau, Thomas C.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Michael D.
dc.dateDecember 1994
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:26:53Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:26:53Z
dc.date.issued1994-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42865
dc.description.abstractThe successful, non-violent transition and consolidation in Spain has been the subject of many studies. There is a literature that suggests that Spain's case may be a valid model for the countries of Central and Eastern Europe as each proceeds toward democratization and capitalism Hungary is used as the representative country of the former Soviet influenced bloc because of its many similarities historically in the twentieth century to other nations which have attempted to consolidate democratic and capitalist institutions. An in-depth study of the Spanish case-including the pre-transition, transition, and consolidation phases-is undertaken to describe the complex changes that took place in Spain during this traumatic process. The Hungarian case study consists of a look at the pre-transistion and transition phases only, as the consolidation phases did not begin until June 1994. The final stage of this study takes the two cases and draws conclusions by comparing and contrasting the changes that have occurred in each of the phases. This thesis calls attention to the specific methods used in each case and demonstrates that, although there are many similarities between the two cases, Spain's case is, in fact, not a valid model for Hungary or the other Central and Eastern European countries.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/spainsconsolidat1094542865
dc.format.extent117 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleSpain's consolidation: a model for Hungary?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.subject.authorNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (USN) authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclcAAZ2824XP
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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