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dc.contributor.advisorFried, David L.
dc.contributor.advisorDavis, David Scott
dc.contributor.authorWager, Nicholas
dc.dateDecember 1994
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T20:26:55Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T20:26:55Z
dc.date.issued1994-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/42875
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis research investigated signal processing oftwo dimensional signals for the detection of targets in noise, particularly in complex background pattern noise. The researchers hypothesized that this type of noise was vulnerable to non-linear processing. They investigated whether the human eye/brain acting as a surrogate for a non-linear processor could outperform an optimum linear processor in a quantitative sense. The researchers did this by conducting computer experiments to determine the ability of an operator and an optimum linear filter to determine a known pattern's presence or absence in a noisy image. The performance of both the operator and optimum linear filter are recorded as probability of detection, probability of false alarm pairs, which the researchers use to determine effective signal-to-noise ratio. The performance of man verus machine (optimum linear filter) is compared quantitatively using the effective signa-to-noise ratio. Operator and machine/filter are tested against circular targets in Random White Gaussian noise and in sattellite images. The researchers report that the machine /filter outperforms the man when the details of both target and background are known in advance, but the man outperforms the machine/filter when the details are known only in a statistical sense.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/automatictargetr1094542875
dc.format.extent145 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAutomatic Target Recognition (ATR) ATR: background statistics and the detection of targets in clutteren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.subject.authorNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Army (USA) authoren_US
dc.identifier.oclcocn640633041
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Applied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineApplied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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