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dc.contributor.authorCenter on Contemporary Conflict
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T22:11:43Z
dc.date.available2014-08-22T22:11:43Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43079
dc.descriptionPerformer: CISAC, Stanford University Principal Investigator: Scott D. Sagan Cost: $100,000 Fiscal Year(s): 2014-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractPolicymakers and scholars widely believe that there is a deep public aversion to nuclear weapons. But there is no empirical evidence on the strength of “antinuclear instincts” and the conditions under which they operate in the United States and other countries. This is especially relevant in light of current debates over “red lines” for military intervention, concerns about non-combatant immunity, and escalation dangers in military conflicts.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPASCCen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subjectNuclear Weaponsen_US
dc.subjectPublic Surveyen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectIndiaen_US
dc.titlePublic Opinion, Commitment Traps, and Nuclear Weapons Policyen_US
dc.typeReporten_US


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