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dc.contributor.authorPion-Berlin, David
dc.contributor.authorTrinkunas, Harold
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T22:46:05Z
dc.date.available2014-08-22T22:46:05Z
dc.date.issued2006-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43087
dc.descriptionPrepared for delivery at the 2006 Meeting of the Latin American Studies Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico March 15-18, 2006.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn an era of widespread democracy in Latin America, attention to civil-military relations and defense policy has become a low priority for both politicians and scholars of the region. Interest has faded with the retreat of militarism and the military in government. Unlike the public debate that national economic, education, or health care policies provoke in most Latin American countries, civil and political society are relatively silent on the issues of national defense. Why do civilian politicians show little interest in investing resources and expertise in defense institutions? Why has there been a parallel drop in scholarly attention as democracies consolidate in the region?en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleAttention Deficits: Why Politicians and Scholars Ignore Defense Policy in Latin Americaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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