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dc.contributor.authorHenderson, David R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-27T15:55:40Z
dc.date.available2014-08-27T15:55:40Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.citationFCPP (Frontier Center for Public Policy) Series No. 112, August 2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43114
dc.description.abstractA federal government runs a large deficit. Deficits are so large that the ratio of federal debt to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) approaches 70 per cent. A constituency of voters have gotten used to large federal spending programs. Does that sound like the United States? Well, yes. But it also describes Canada in 1993. Yet, just 16 years later, Canada’s federal debt had fallen from 67 per cent to only 29 per cent of GDP. Moreover, in every year between 1997 and 2008, Canada’s federal government had a budget surplus. In one fiscal year, 2000–2001, its surplus was a whopping 1.8 per cent of GDP. If the U.S. government had such a surplus today, that would amount to a cool $263 billion rather than the current deficit of more than $1.5 trillion.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCanada's Budget Triumphen_US
dc.typeNewsletteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)


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