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dc.contributor.authorPorch, Douglas
dc.dateSpring 2000
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-02T17:36:40Z
dc.date.available2014-09-02T17:36:40Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationInternational Security, Vol. 24, No. 4, (Spring 2000), pp. 157–180
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43177
dc.description.abstractOn May 10, 1940, Germany’s panzers launched their westward assault on France. Attacking through the thick forests of the Ardennes, German forces rapidly breached French defenses near Sedan, then swept west to envelop the main French and British armies that had advanced to meet what French Commander in Chief Maurice Gamelin had expected to be the main German attack in Belgium. Adolf Hitler’s legions marched into Paris on June 12, 1940. A shattered French government, overwhelmed by the magnitude of its defeat, sued for peace and signed an armistice at Compiègne on June 22, 1940. The British Expeditionary Force ºed across the English Channel, abandoning its equipment on the beaches of Dunkirk. Few defeats in military history have been as rapid, decisive, and unexpected.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleMilitary "Culture" and the Fall of France in 1940, A Review Essayen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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