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dc.contributor.authorSiegel, Scott N.
dc.dateWinter 2010
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-02T18:02:50Z
dc.date.available2014-09-02T18:02:50Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMediterranean Quarterly, Volume 21, Issue 1, Winter 2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43185
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1215/10474552-2009-033en_US
dc.description.abstractThe eastward enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization continues unabated. In 2009 the alliance welcomed Croatia and Albania into the fold. Discussions over possible membership continue with the Republic of Georgia and Ukraine. Current NATO policy is also in favor of Montenegro’s and Bosnia-Herzegovina’s joining some day. However, recent international events and continued shortcomings in these countries’ domestic political institutions preclude entry any time soon. In contrast, the Former Yugoslavia Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) ranks high among the countries that have supposedly made the most significant progress in the reforms necessary to secure membership. If the Greek government had not vetoed inclusion of FYROM in the latest round of expansion with the rest of the Adriatic-3 (FYROM with Croatia and Albania), NATO would most likely have admitted it in January 2009 as its twenty-ninth member.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleWeighing Macedonia’s Entry into NATOen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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