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dc.contributor.authorChavez, Francisco P.
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Curtis A.
dc.contributor.authorHuyer, Adriana
dc.contributor.authorMackas, David L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-04T17:57:34Z
dc.date.available2014-09-04T17:57:34Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationProgress in Oceanography, Volume 54, (2002), pp. 1–5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43242
dc.description.abstractThe fisherman of northern Peru coined the name El Niño in the late nineteenth century for a warm southward current that appeared every year around Christmas (the Christ child – El Niño). Years of unusually high rainfall in northern Peru were associated with an intensification of the annual current. It was not until the 1960s that Bjerknes (1966) linked warming of the coastal ocean off Peru (and the equatorial Pacific) with larger scale climatic phenomena. It was then that a relatively small and inoffensive coastal current (Chavez, 1986) was associated with dramatic global weather disturbances. Over the last 30 years the influence of El Niño on oceanic and atmospheric conditions throughout the globe has been well documented (Rasmusson and Wallace, 1983; Philander, 1990). More recently, in the 1980s, Peruvian scientists coined the name La Niña for anomalously cool temperatures along Peru. This phenomenon also has significant climatic impacts.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleEl Niño along the west coast of North America, Editorialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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