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dc.contributor.authorGodson, Roy
dc.contributor.authorWirtz, James J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-04T23:09:54Z
dc.date.available2014-09-04T23:09:54Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Intelligence and Counter Intelligence, Volume 13, Number 4, pp. 424-437, 2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43266
dc.description.abstractA concern about the threat of high-level denial and deception has waxed and waned among Americans since the end of World War II. Sometimes they fear that denial and deception has shaped threat assessments: witness the 1976 "A Team/B Team experiment" in competitive intelligence analysis undertaken by the Gerald R. Ford White House. At other times, the threat of denial and deception-here the euphoria accompanying the end of the Cold War comes to mind-seems to fade into insignificance. As the United States reigns as the only superpower and the world experiences a communication revolution, how much of a threat does denial and deception pose to American interests today? Do globalization, proliferating communication technologies, and the dissemination of vast amounts of information make effective foreign denial and deception more or less likely? Will more information and data sources make policymakers better informed or will the proliferation of information simply create confusion?en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleStrategic Denial and Deceptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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