Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBruneau, Thomas C.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-09T18:29:32Z
dc.date.available2014-09-09T18:29:32Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43285
dc.descriptionVolume 1, Cebrien_US
dc.description.abstractThe author proposes in this paper a new framework for the analysis of civil – military relations in the U.S. and applies it to the use of private security contractors, mainly in Iraq. He argues that the academic literature on civil – military relations in the U.S. is not well focused as it concentrates exclusively on control, and is thus totally marginal to the contemporary debates on the use of force to achieve national goals. He illustrates this point by looking to the most serious national defense reform initiatives from the Goldwater – Nichols Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 up until the current major effort, the Project on National Security Reform. He then applies this framework to the use of private security contractors (PSC) and finds that they are problematic both in terms of control and effectiveness.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titlePatriots for Profit: analyzing private security contractors in the U.S. from a civil-military perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.) Monterey, California
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record