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dc.contributor.authorYost, David S.
dc.dateFall 1982
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-15T16:51:33Z
dc.date.available2014-09-15T16:51:33Z
dc.date.issued1982
dc.identifier.citationInternational Security, Fall 1982, Vol. 7, No. 2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43332
dc.description.abstractT h e Atlantic Alliance may be at the threshold of a new debate on the implications of ballistic missile defense (BMD) for European security. Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and several U.S. Senators and Congressmen support a thorough review of U.S. BMD options, including possible revision of the 1972 Anti- Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and its 1974 Protocol. Although active defense of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) seems the most likely application for BMD, other strategic defense options are reportedly under consideration. European-based BMD against theater ballistic missiles such as the SS-20, SS- 21, SS-22, and SS-23 is being examined as well. Such defenses are known as anti-tactical ballistic missiles (ATBM) or anti-tactical missiles (ATM). The term “ATM” is preferred in that it implies capability against cruise as well as ballistic missiles.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleBallistic Missile Defense and the Atlantic Allianceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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