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dc.contributor.authorGiraldo, Jeanne Kinney
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-16T17:58:39Z
dc.date.available2014-09-16T17:58:39Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43362
dc.description.abstractAfter a transition away from authoritarianism, one of the central challenges facing new democratic elites is redefining civil-military relations. Among other things, this means writing or revising constitutions and laws that regulate the roles, rights, and obligations of the military so that they conform to the basic democratic principles of accountability to democratically elected leaders and respect for civil liberties.1 Under the preceding non-democratic regimes, militaries were often accustomed to acting in ways that violated these principles, by operating autonomously within the defense arena, playing an important role in non-defense areas, and participating in regime violations of human rights.2 Although writing new laws designed to modify this behavior will not automatically lead to a change, it is a necessary first step.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Center for Civil-Military Relations, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDemocratizing Civil-Military Relations: What do Countries Legislate? Occasional Paper #7en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)en_US


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