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dc.contributor.authorArquilla, John
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-22T21:54:55Z
dc.date.available2014-09-22T21:54:55Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationPrism, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 23-33, 2014.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43369
dc.description.abstractThe fundamental dynamic of the Cold War era was an arms race to build nuclear weapons. But in the long, often covert, “cool war” against al-Qaeda and its affiliates that began in earnest after September 11, 2001, the driving force has been – and continues to be – an “organizational race” to build networks. It has grown increasingly apparent that the latest advances in information technology have greatly empowered flat, essentially leaderless groups unified more by pursuit of a common goal than any kind of central control. In the elegant phrasing of David Weinberger, co-author of a key contribution to the emerging information-age canon, The Cluetrain Manifesto, networks, particularly web-enabled ones, are comprised of “small pieces loosely joined.”1 Weinberger’s language offers a particularly apt description of al-Qaeda today, as the group’s original concentrated core, formed around Osama bin Laden and Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri, has long since given way to a far flatter, much more widely dispersed set of relatively independent cells and nodes.en_US
dc.publisherPrismen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleTo Build a Networken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis


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