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dc.contributor.authorFischer, Julie E.
dc.contributor.authorParanjape, Suman
dc.contributor.authorMohlman, Mary Kate
dc.contributor.authorSorrell, Erin
dc.contributor.authorKatz, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-22T22:20:58Z
dc.date.available2014-09-22T22:20:58Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43371
dc.descriptionThis white paper results from research supported by the Naval Postgraduate School’s Project on Advanced Systems and Concepts for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction (PASCC) via Grant No 244-13-1-0025 awarded by the NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center San Diego. The views expressed in this report do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Naval Postgraduate School nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2005, the United States and the other Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) agreed to a new approach to global health security. Recognizing that international agreements rooted in the nineteenth century no longer sufficiently addressed the health threats posed by novel, emerging, and reemerging pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza, the World Health Assembly (WHA) adopted the revised International Health Regulations [IHR (2005)].1 The revised IHR entered into force in June 2007. IHR (2005) obligate the now- 196 States Parties to develop the core capacities required to detect, assess, report, and respond to public health emergencies of international concern. The regulations cover biological, chemical, radiological/nuclear, and other threats to public health, regardless of origin (naturally, accidentally, or deliberately released).en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleIHR (2005) Compliance: Laboratory Capacities and Biological Risksen_US
dc.typeBooken_US


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