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dc.contributor.authorBatteen, Mary L.
dc.contributor.authorMartinho, Antonio S.
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Henry A.
dc.contributor.authorMcClean, Julie L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-29T15:32:42Z
dc.date.available2014-09-29T15:32:42Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationOcean Modelling, Volume 18, (2007) pp. 1–36
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43388
dc.description.abstractIn a hierarchy of increasing complexity of physical forcing mechanisms, we conduct a process-oriented study of the Northern Canary Current System (NCCS) with a terrain-following numerical ocean model (in this case the Princeton Ocean Model, POM) to investigate the forcing mechanisms for the classical as well as unique features of the NCCS. While most of the NCCS features are realistically simulated, a key comparison of the results shows that unexpectedly a realistic subsurface mesoscale feature is simulated in a flat bottom NCCS model but not in the same model with bottom topography. We then show that this is a consequence of a numerical choice, which leads to the use of an improved technique to smooth the bottom topography, which better preserves the raw topography and subsequently is shown to produce the subsurface feature. This choice is then used in the final and most realistic of the NCCS experiments, in which a high temporal resolution study is conducted from March to September 1996 for the NCCS coastal ocean domain using daily winds and thermohaline forcing initialized on 2 March 1996 from a one-way coupled North Atlantic Parallel Ocean Program (POP) model updated at the lateral boundaries of the POM model every three days. A key physical result is that a dynamic flow consistent with the Azores Current is produced in this experiment, a feature not produced in the other experiments which used climatological data at the open boundaries. The results of these process-oriented experiments emphasize that numerical models of ocean circulation require important choices, which are both numerical and physical.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleA process-oriented modelling study of the coastal Canary and Iberian Current systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentOceanography
dc.subject.authorCoastal circulationen_US
dc.subject.authorEastern boundary currentsen_US
dc.subject.authorNumerical modelingen_US
dc.subject.authorCanary currenten_US
dc.subject.authorPrinceton ocean modelen_US
dc.subject.authorPOMen_US
dc.subject.authorParallel ocean programen_US
dc.subject.authorPOPen_US


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