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dc.contributor.authorPowell, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorMillar, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-08T23:12:44Z
dc.date.available2014-10-08T23:12:44Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43485
dc.description.abstractAerospace systems that fail in service are often repaired or refurbished and returned to service. 1 2 3 Repair/refurbishment may return the system to the equivalent of new condition, to some state less than new condition, or perhaps even to a better than new condition. Respectively, repair/refurbishment may have no effect on future reliability, degrade future reliability, or improve it. Depending on which reliability state the post-failure repair/refurbishment produces for the system, preventative maintenance schemes can differ dramatically. For example, should the repair/refurbishment return the system to a less than new condition with each subsequent failure, shorter preventative maintenance intervals as a function of number of the maintenance cycles increase overall availability and cost effectiveness. Should the repair/refurbishment return the system to a better than new condition, longer preventative maintenance intervals as a function of number of maintenance cycles increase overall availability and cost effectiveness.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMethod for Investigating Repair/Refurbishment Effectivenessen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystems Engineering


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