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dc.contributor.advisorGlosny, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorDundon, Jeffrey R., Jr.
dc.dateSep-14
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-05T20:10:12Z
dc.date.available2014-12-05T20:10:12Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43904
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis study considers the triggers that may cause China to use economic coercion in bilateral state disputes. The literature reviewed shows that economic statecraft and coercion is a viable policy tool for shaping an opposing state’s behavior and the degree to which a state holds an asymmetrical economic advantage influences its ability to wield this tool. China’s rising power has made the study and understanding of the conditions under which China will utilize economic coercion an imperative as more states become vulnerable to it. China has already revealed that it is willing to shape state behavior through economic carrots and sticks. As demonstrated by the case studies explored in this thesis, China uses economic coercion to defend its territorial integrity and sovereignty and its understanding of the status quo. Where it holds an economically asymmetrical advantage, China has targeted specific sectors for coercion as a way to signal resolve. As Chinese economic power continues to rise relative to regional neighbors and the U.S., the feasibility of using economic coercion also increases, making the future employment of economic coercion likely wherever China perceives a threat to its interests that is cannot be solved with its increasing military might.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/triggersofchines1094543904
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleTriggers of Chinese economic coercionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWeiner, Robert J.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorJapanen_US
dc.subject.authorPhilippinesen_US
dc.subject.authoreconomic statecraften_US
dc.subject.authorasymmetric interdependenceen_US
dc.subject.authorsanctionsen_US
dc.subject.authorrare earthsen_US
dc.subject.authorSenkaku Islandsen_US
dc.subject.authorEast China Seaen_US
dc.subject.authorScarborough Shoalen_US
dc.subject.authorDalai Lamaen_US
dc.subject.authorSouth China Seaen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, And The Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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