Publication:
Expanded kill chain analysis of manned-unmanned teaming for future strike operations

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Authors
Lee, Joong Yang
Subjects
systems engineering
manned-unmanned teaming
unmanned aerial vehicle
kill chains
Advisors
Chung, Timothy H.
Date of Issue
2014-09
Date
Sep-14
Publisher
Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
This study explores the concept of manned-unmanned teaming in the context of the joint capability areas and investigates the expanded kill chain for a manned and unmanned team for future strike operations. The study first elucidated capabilities that can be realized by manned-unmanned teams. A design reference mission for a manned-unmanned team (strike) operation was developed, enabling operational activity and functional analysis of the expanded kill chain. Simulation models were built to examine the time-efficiencies of the manned-unmanned teaming concept. This research used insights from the results of the models to explore alternatives in asset generation and systems link-up tactics. The analysis of strike operations cycle times that include total mission operations time, airborne time, and time to complete systems link-up provided data to generate recommendations. Besides identifying areas on which to focus efficiency improvement efforts, this study also proposes tactics and concept of operations to enhance the effectiveness of strike operations by manned-unmanned teams. This study reveals that fighter endurance is a limiting factor in manned-unmanned operations and proposes a synchronized launch or pre-launch establishment of communications and datalink as possible ways to mitigate these limiting factors.
Type
Thesis
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Series/Report No
Department
Systems Engineering (SE)
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NPS Report Number
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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