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dc.contributor.advisorRussell, James
dc.contributor.authorRoe, Carlos M.
dc.dateSep-14
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-05T20:10:48Z
dc.date.available2014-12-05T20:10:48Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43988
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractInsurgency and irregular war continue to be a prevalent phenomenon in the international system. Fighting irregular wars challenge military doctrine used by established militaries across the developed world. These militaries invariably end up combating insurgencies through train and equip missions, although the adoption of train and equip usually happens after the insurgency has become well established. This thesis examines and analyzes approaches taken by the organized militaries from Afghanistan,Turkey, and Columbia in fighting their insurgencies, and the role that the train-and-equip mission played in preparing their respective militaries for their mission. To support the research, each case study is built upon an analysis of the history of each insurgency and the counterinsurgency (COIN) response from the state and military forces. How did the countries train and equip their forces to battle the insurgency? What findings and policy implications can be derived from examining these different COIN case studies? This thesis finds that the training and equipping mission should be a top priority for all nations fighting an insurgency. In addition, the successes and failures from the three case studies examined show that regardless of the cause of the insurgency, once the insurgency is in full swing, one of the key elements to defeat the insurgency is with a properly trained self-sustaining force.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theimpactoftrain1094543988
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe impact of train and equip practices to counter insurgenciesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderJohnson, Thomas
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorAfghanistanen_US
dc.subject.authorTurkeyen_US
dc.subject.authorColombiaen_US
dc.subject.authortrainen_US
dc.subject.authorequipen_US
dc.subject.authorinsurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorcounterinsurgencyen_US
dc.subject.authorPKKen_US
dc.subject.authorFARCen_US
dc.subject.authormobile training teamen_US
dc.subject.authorself-sustaining forceen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary adaptationen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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