Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBach, Robert
dc.contributor.authorSanford, Abigail J.
dc.dateSep-14
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-05T20:10:49Z
dc.date.available2014-12-05T20:10:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/43993
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractA bill that has passed the United States Senate, S. 744, proposes a Lawful Prospective Immigrant (LPI) status and a path to Citizenship for an estimated 11–12 million undocumented immigrants in the United States. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the agency that would be responsible for processing applications for LPI status or other immigration benefits authorized by immigration reform legislation or administrative relief programs introduced by the White House. Current agency receipts of applications for immigration benefits range between 6 and 7 million per year. Depending on the eligibility criteria for new immigration benefits, agency receipts could triple. The operational impact of these legislative or executive actions on USCIS could bear significant national security risks. This study evaluates whether the implementation of automated tools would mitigate external operational impacts on USCIS. Two existing automated systems are studied. The Secure Flight system, operated by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), and the Automated Continuous Evaluation System (ACES) as utilized in the Joint Reform Effort (JRE) were selected for their complexity, maturity, and similarity to immigration adjudications. This analysis demonstrates that automated tools can improve the quality of immigration adjudications by supporting a comprehensive assessment, including accuracy, timeliness, completeness and validity. Further, automation would improve the agency’s operational responsiveness when external factors such as policy changes affect workloads. These factors thereby improve national security by supporting the agency’s mission to uphold the integrity of the immigration system and to prevent and intercept illicit actors from entering or remaining in the United States.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleImmigration adjudication reform: the case for automationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBergin, Richard
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorAutomated Records Checksen_US
dc.subject.authorBackground Checksen_US
dc.subject.authorDecision Support Systemsen_US
dc.subject.authorImmigration Adjudicationsen_US
dc.subject.authorImmigration Reformen_US
dc.subject.authorInvestigationsen_US
dc.subject.authorNational Securityen_US
dc.subject.authorOperational Efficiencyen_US
dc.subject.authorResource Allocationen_US
dc.description.serviceUnited States Citizenship and Immigration Servicesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record