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dc.contributor.authorFried, David L.
dc.date1995-05
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-10T19:07:56Z
dc.date.available2014-12-10T19:07:56Z
dc.date.issued1995-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44114
dc.descriptionJ. Opt. Soc. Am. A, Volume 12, No. 5, pp. 950-957 (May 1995)en_US
dc.description.abstractAt any instant the optical effects of atmospheric turbulence can result in a somewhat distorted image. As a consequence, the image of the horizon that ought to appear to be a smooth straight line may instead appear somewhat irregular. When we consider turbulence effects we call into question the idea that a small object that we expect to see just above the horizon will stand out (i..e., will be detectable) because it appears as a bump on what is otherwise a smooth straight horizon line. The degree of irregularity that turbulence may be expected to introduce in the image of the horizon is studied, and a theory that permits evaluation of the vertical irregularity as a function of horizontal extent is developed. It is concluded that for a sample case the effect is small but that, for an object close enough to the horizon line, the detection of this object could be interfered with by this effect.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleHorizon irregularity induced by turbulenceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physics
dc.subject.authorturbulenceen_US
dc.subject.authorimage distortionen_US
dc.subject.authorhorizonen_US
dc.subject.authorapparent irregularityen_US
dc.subject.authortarget detectionen_US


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