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dc.contributor.authorOsmundson, John S.
dc.contributor.authorGottfried, Russell
dc.contributor.authorKum, Chee Yang
dc.contributor.authorBoon, Lau Hui
dc.contributor.authorLian, Lim Wei
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, Poh Seng Wee
dc.contributor.authorThye, Tan Choo
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-12T23:45:50Z
dc.date.available2014-12-12T23:45:50Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationSystems Engineering, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44175
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sys.20012en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents a method for performing architectural analyses of complex systems-ofsystems using process modeling. A process is a series of actions undertaken by a system-ofsystems to produce one or more end results, typically products and services. The method applies to systems-of systems whose effectiveness and performance depend strongly on process timelines, such as distributed information systems, logistics systems, and manufacturing and distribution systems. A fundamental tool in this method is the development of a unified modeling language (UML) related view of the system-of-system processes of interest and the subsequent conversion of the UML related view into an end-to-end system-of-systems executable object-oriented simulation model. This method is illustrated by applying process modeling and simulation to analysis of a military systems-of-systems, an expeditionary warfare system envisioned for the 2015à ¢ 2020 time frame. Expeditionary warfare is the operation of an armed force in an area far from a supportable home base and supported by temporarily established means. The U.S. military has conducted expeditionary warfare in the past by building up forces, equipment, and supplies at a beachhead before moving on to an objective. There is current interest in the U.S. military to shift from the concept of establishing a beachhead and then movement to an objective to a concept of sea-based launching and supporting forces and sea-to-objective maneuver for fighting forces. A fundamental tool in this analysis is an end-to-end object-oriented simulation model emulating the full implementation of these force architectures and design factors as well as accounting for the impact of varying levels of operational intensity, attrition of personnel and transport vehicles, weather, mining sea lanes, transport vehicle operating and availability constraints, landing spot constraints, and transit and communications delays. This paper focuses on the framework of the simulation model and its most significant findings as applied to expeditionary warfare concepts as an example of the application of process modeling to architectural analyses of complex systems-of-systems.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleProcess Modeling: A Systems Engineering Tool for Analyzing Complex Systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Sciences and Systems Engineering
dc.subject.authorprocess modelingen_US
dc.subject.authorsystems of systems analysisen_US
dc.subject.authormodeling and simulationen_US


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