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dc.contributor.authorDomaschk, Lori N.
dc.contributor.authorOuroua, Abdelhamid
dc.contributor.authorHebner, Robert E.
dc.contributor.authorBowlin, Oscar E.
dc.contributor.authorColson, W.B.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-16T00:16:16Z
dc.date.available2014-12-16T00:16:16Z
dc.date.issued2007-01
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Vol. 43, No. 1, January 2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44195
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TMAG.2006.887676en_US
dc.description.abstractPart of the technical versatility of future all-electric ships is the potential ability to share large amounts of power among a variety of high-power loads. To help evaluate this potential and to provide information to help guide technology selection, a physics-based model of a power train for an electric ship has been developed and implemented on three modeling platforms. Using this model, three different investigations have been carried out to explore aspects of the behavior of a rotating machine power source for a shipboard rail launcher. These were: 1) influence of rapid charging of the rotating machine system on the ship power system; 2) use of the stored energy in the rotating machines to improve ship power quality; and 3) use of the stored energy in the rotating machines to power a pulsed free-electron laser. Each study highlighted different integration opportunities and challenges. The first showed that, because the charging of the rail launchers was through 5-MW motors, there could be a voltage sag for a few cycles, but this could easily be managed so that the sag could be reduced to an inconsequential level. The second study showed that, with appropriate power electronics, the stored energy in the rail launcher power supply can be used to correct power quality problems introduced by other ship systems. Finally, the stored energy in the launcher power supply can be used to fire a free electron laser for ship defense. This feature opens the possibility of routine operation of the entire ship at highest efficiency, i.e., with the smallest number of gas turbines operating near full power, while providing stored energy needed for ship defense.en_US
dc.publisherIEEEen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleCoordination of Large Pulsed Loads on Future Electric Shipsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPhysics
dc.subject.authorElectric shipen_US
dc.subject.authorenergy storageen_US
dc.subject.authorpower systemen_US
dc.subject.authorpulse loadsen_US
dc.description.funderThis work was supported by the Office of Naval Research.en_US


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