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dc.contributor.authorArmey, Laura E.
dc.contributor.authorLipow, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Natalie J.
dc.contributor.otherDefense Resources Management Institute (DRMI)
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-28T01:01:54Z
dc.date.available2015-01-28T01:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44415
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infoecopol.2014.10.002en_US
dc.descriptionDataset is included.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we test the hypothesis that access to electronic payments may reduce crime. Our results suggest that there is a negative and significant statistical relationship between access to electronic payments and the incidence of economic crimes such as robbery and burglary, while electronic transactions do little to reduce the incidence of non-economic crimes such as homicide and rape. This paper provides evidence that policies and technol- ogies that enable the proliferation of cashless transactions have the desired impact of deterring crime.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Electronic Financial Payments on Crimeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.authorelectronic financial transactionsen_US
dc.subject.authorcrimeen_US
dc.subject.authorcashless economyen_US


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