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dc.contributor.authorArmey, Laura E.
dc.contributor.authorMcNab, Robert M.
dc.contributor.otherDefense Resources Management Institute (DRMI)
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-28T01:04:42Z
dc.date.available2015-01-28T01:04:42Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44416
dc.descriptionFinal Manuscript copy.en_US
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00036846.2014.1000529en_US
dc.descriptionDataset is included.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the impact of civil war on democratization, particularly focussing on whether civil war provides an opportunity for institutional reform. We investigate the impact of war termination in general, along with prolonged violence, rebel victory, and international intervention on democratization. Using an unbalanced panel data set of 96 countries covering a 34-year period, our analysis suggests that civil war lowers democratization in the succeeding period. Our findings also suggest that United Nations intervention increases democratization, as do wars ending in stalemates. However, wars ending in rebel victories seem to reduce democratization. These findings appear robust to conditioning, different instrument sets, modelling techniques, and the measurement of democracy.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDemocratization and Civil Waren_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.subject.authorCivil Waren_US
dc.subject.authorDemocracyen_US
dc.subject.authorConflicten_US
dc.subject.authorDemocratizationen_US
dc.subject.authorOutcomes of Waren_US


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