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dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.advisorNieto-Gomez, Rodrigo
dc.contributor.authorEnglish, Angela Yvonne
dc.dateDec-14
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-18T00:17:32Z
dc.date.available2015-02-18T00:17:32Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44555
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe nation’s socially constructed deficit-oriented discourse and linear organizational structure is incongruent with the decentralized, interconnected, and complex adaptive problems faced by homeland security. The thesis question is: Can the homeland security enterprise benefit from a people-centric, strengths-based systems approach to increase the nation’s ability to adapt, withstand and recover from disasters? In the current linear dominated all-hazards world, the ranks are experiencing less trust, less security, less cooperation, less effectiveness, and less happiness. In contrast, a people-centric, strengths-based world, in which community is central, features more involvement, more trust, more resiliency, more participation, more inclusiveness, and more empowerment. This thesis aims to show that the collective of homeland security needs an all-opportunities plan, a new way of thinking, based on the strengths of communities and the willingness of the American people to contribute. The concepts of appreciative inquiry, positive deviance, social network analysis, and social construction examined in research, and case studies were used to provide recommendations for the future. The thesis posits that the homeland security enterprise has evolved into a homeland security ecosystem due to globalization, social complexity, ubiquitous smart technologies, and the ability of communities of interest to form outside of traditional organizational structures.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.titlePeople-first homeland security: recalibrating for community collaboration and engagement within a homeland security ecosystemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorcommunity engagementen_US
dc.subject.authorhomeland security ecosystemen_US
dc.subject.authorpositive deviancyen_US
dc.subject.authorabundanceen_US
dc.subject.authorcommunity asset mappingen_US
dc.subject.authorpeople-firsten_US
dc.subject.authorpeer-to-peeren_US
dc.subject.authorsharing economyen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial constructionen_US
dc.subject.authorwicked problemsen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial network analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorself-organizing systemsen_US
dc.subject.authordisruptive innovationen_US
dc.subject.authorplain languageen_US
dc.subject.authornetworked governanceen_US
dc.subject.authorappreciative inquiryen_US
dc.subject.authorresiliencyen_US
dc.subject.authoropportunity bubblesen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial complexityen_US
dc.subject.authorcognitive surplusen_US
dc.description.serviceExecutive Director, Texas Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities, Austin, Texasen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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