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dc.contributor.advisorGrbovic, Dragoslav
dc.contributor.advisorDenardo, Andres
dc.contributor.authorHouseholder, Timothy J.
dc.dateDec-14
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-18T00:17:44Z
dc.date.available2015-02-18T00:17:44Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44583
dc.description.abstractEvery machine vibrates and emits noise. This is unused energy that, with an appropriate mechanism, can be returned to the system. Utilizing an array of piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices to harvest this otherwise wasted energy, it is possible to improve the efficiency of any number of mechanical devices. Piezoelectricity is the mechanism by which certain crystalline structures generate electric potential when under strain, or, conversely, deform when subjected to an electric potential. It is this first effect that is important to this application. Though each MEMS device will generate a very small amount of power, a 1 m2 area can contain an array of millions of these devices. Energy harvesting, conservation, and efficiency are all key Department of Defense (DOD) priorities, and the universal application of these devices make them ideal for any expeditionary platform, such as ships, aircraft, and automobiles. This thesis designs and tests the first generations of acoustic and vibrational piezoelectric MEMS devices; including time-dependent finite element models, microfabrication processes, and the initial attempts at characterization and optimization.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/memsbasedwastevi1094544583
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMEMS-based waste vibration and acoustic energy harvestersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPhysics
dc.subject.authorMEMSen_US
dc.subject.authorenergy harvestingen_US
dc.subject.authorpiezoelectricen_US
dc.subject.authorresonatoren_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science In Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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