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dc.contributor.advisorJaskoski, Maiah
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Reese H.
dc.dateDec-14
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-18T00:17:46Z
dc.date.available2015-02-18T00:17:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44588
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the degree to which U.S. policy toward Venezuela helps to explain the decrease of U.S. influence in Latin America, focusing on the period since 1998, when left-leaning Hugo Chávez took office as President of Venezuela. The thesis argues that U.S. foreign policy toward Venezuela has negatively affected its regional influence in Latin America, in two ways. First, by adopting policy stances toward Venezuela that have been both swift and hardline relative to the dominant Organization of American States (OAS) stances, the U.S. has to a certain degree isolated itself from the OAS, an organization that operates on consensus. Second, it seems that U.S. antagonism toward Venezuela has helped encourage the rise of regional organizations that compete with the OAS and in which the U.S. is not a part. Therefore, to the extent to which the U.S. has retained influence in the OAS, that influence matters less at a regional level than it otherwise would, due to the competing organizations. The thesis argues that, to regain some of its lost influence within Latin America, the United States must first pursue matters of mutual agreement within the OAS to regain trust from the member states. From there, the United States can once again engage in effective foreign policy with Venezuela, but through the OAS as an intermediary.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/losinginfluencer1094544588
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleLosing influence: regional effects of U.S. foreign policy with Venezuelaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderSotomayor, Arturo
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorVenezuelaen_US
dc.subject.authorOASen_US
dc.subject.authorHugo Chávezen_US
dc.subject.authorForeign Policyen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Western Hemisphere)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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