Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLindsey, Lisa L. Massi
dc.contributor.advisorRendon, Juanita M.
dc.contributor.authorSkidmore, Kristofer A.
dc.contributor.authorOrtiz, Paul R.
dc.dateDec-14
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-18T00:18:15Z
dc.date.available2015-02-18T00:18:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44671
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractResearch shows that humans are, on average, only slightly better-than-chance at deception detection. Meta-analysis conducted by Charles Bond and Bella DePaulo in their work Accuracy of Deception Judgments published by Personality and Social Psychology Review in 2006 yields an across-study average accuracy rate of 54%. Although prior research has failed to identify variables that have a large impact on accuracy, a recent set of studies focused on diagnostic utility (strategic questioning) leads us to expect substantial question effects producing levels of accuracy that differ substantially from chance. Recent research advocated for abandoning cue-based deception detection in favor of the idea of diagnostic utility. Specifically, this new line of research provides a basis for specifying the conditions under which questioning of honest and deceptive individuals yields levels of deception detection accuracy that depart substantially in both directions from the usual slightly-better-than-chance results that characterize past attempts. This thesis is a replication of these most recent diagnostic utility studies to determine if the methods are (1) generalizable to a new population and (2) useful in identifying specific questioning strategies relevant to Department of Defense and fraud investigation activities.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/deceptiondetecti1094544671
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDeception detection process and accuracy: an examination of how U.S. military officers detect deception in the workplaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorDeception Detectionen_US
dc.subject.authorFraud Investigationen_US
dc.subject.authorDiagnostic Utilityen_US
dc.subject.authorQuestioning Methodsen_US
dc.subject.authorStrategic Questioningen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Management and Master of Arts in Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineManagement And Master of Arts In Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record