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dc.contributor.authorBarma, Naazneen
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Kai
dc.contributor.authorViñuela, Lorena
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-25T23:52:13Z
dc.date.available2015-02-25T23:52:13Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44700
dc.description.abstractSubsoil natural resource endowments and associated rents --if well harnessed and managed--can serve as a boon to developing countries. Yet, too often, the extractive industries of oil, gas, and mining have been associated with the "resource curse" whereby nations that are more dependent on nonrenewable natural resources grow more slowly than resourcepoor countries and often suffer from weaker governance and institutional quality.i In many developing countries, natural resources are the main game in town--and the extractive industries sector is both shaped by and, in turn, influences political, economic, societal, and institutional dynamics. Understanding the political economy of resource rents is therefore crucial to achieving sustainable development built on resource riches.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleRents to Riches? Factoring in the Political Economy of Natural Resource-Led Developmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


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