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dc.contributor.authorTucker, David
dc.dateAutumn, 2000
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-10T19:29:03Z
dc.date.available2015-03-10T19:29:03Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44721
dc.description.abstractThe Joint Staff knows why interagency coordination does not occur. According to a Joint Staff memorandum, “in the past it has been extremely difficult to achieve coordinated interdepartmental planning” for two reasons: other agencies of the U. S. government do not understand “systematic planning procedures” and each agency has its own approach to solving problems. The State Department, for example, values flexibility and its ability to respond to daily changes in a situation more than it does planning, while the CIA is reluctant to coordinate for security reasons and USIA holds Defense and the CIA at arm’s length for fear that it will be seen as a mere dispenser of propaganda. If we are to have interagency coordination, the memorandum warns, “these inhibitions of other governmental agencies must in some way be overcome.”en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe RMA and the Interagency: Knowledge and Speed vs. Ignorance and Sloth?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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