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dc.contributor.authorMcNab, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMelese, Francois
dc.dateSummer 2003
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-08T22:31:05Z
dc.date.available2015-04-08T22:31:05Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationPublic Budgeting & Finance / Summer 2003en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/44899
dc.description.abstractThe Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) is the latest in a series of attempts to introduce performance-based management and budgeting techniques at the federal level in the United States. In the past, these attempts largely failed due to administrative complexities, lack of investment in managerial, accounting, and information systems, and the absence of institutional incentives to promote gains in economic efficiency. Whereas we find the objectives of the GPRA laudable, we question whether this current incarnation of performance budgeting can succeed in transforming the traditional focus of federal budgeting from annual appropriations and obligations to multiyear outputs and outcomes.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleImplementing the GPRA: Examining the Prospects for Performance Budgeting in the Federal Governmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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